Distracted Driving

According to the Colorado Department of Transportation, distracted driving causes forty collisions per day.

That’s right. Forty per day.

Distracted driving kills more teenagers and young people than drunk driving. In fact, distracted driving accounts for 58% of teen crashes.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration defines distracted driving as any activity that diverts attention away from the primary task of driving. This is not restricted to cell phones and texts. Changing a station on the radio, talking to kids in the back seat, rearranging mirrors, looking at activity on the sidewalk or a parking lot – all these are examples of distracted driving.

How do we prove that a driver was distracted?

Getting on-the-ground investigation started from the very beginning is crucial. Collecting videos, witness statements, and scene information is critical to proving that the at-fault party gave in to some other distraction versus paying attention and getting home safely.

Distracted drivers have now overcome drunk drivers as the leading cause of auto accidents. And over 40,000 Americans are injured annually in traffic collisions. If you or a loved one are involved in a collision with a distracted driver, consider giving our experienced team the opportunity to protect your interests from the very beginning.

Jennifer O’Connell, our Managing Partner, has gone to local schools to teach teenagers about the dangers of distracted driving. But the truth is that adults are just as guilty. We have to send that quick email, check that score, add a stop on our map, rewind our podcast, or yell at our kids in the back. Every second of a distraction is 88 feet traveled at 60 mph in highway traffic. By the time we hit the breaks, which takes much more than a second to react and accomplish, we’ve traveled a football field and it’s way too late.